Free Walking Tour Berlin

When: Every day 10am & 12pm every day
Where: The meeting point is in front of the ehemaliges Kaiserliches Postfuhramt Berlin, Oranienburger Straße, 10117 Berlin, Germany, next to the entrance.
Price: Free

The Berlin Wall: Unveiling the Divide

by | Oct 17, 2023 | Original Berlin

When it comes to pivotal moments in modern history, few events have been as impactful and symbolic as the division of Berlin. The city of Berlin, which stood as the epicenter of Cold War tensions, was split into East and West Berlin by the construction of the Berlin Wall. This physical barrier, built in 1961, served as a tangible representation of the ideological and political divide between the Eastern and Western Blocs. In this article, we will explore the reasons behind the division of East and West Berlin and delve into the historical context that shaped it.

The Causes of Division

The division of Berlin can be traced back to the aftermath of World War II. As Germany surrendered in 1945, the victorious Allied powers – the United States, the Soviet Union, Great Britain, and France – divided the war-torn country into four occupation zones. Berlin, located in the Soviet-occupied zone, was similarly partitioned. However, these occupation zones quickly became sources of contention and rivalry among the Allies. The city of Berlin, which was deep inside East Germany, became a microcosm of Cold War tensions.

Rivalry Between the East and the West

The ideological differences between the Soviet Union and the Western Allies played a significant role in the division of Berlin. The West, embracing capitalism and democracy, aimed to rebuild Germany under a unified government. However, the Soviet Union, having suffered immense loss during the war and eager to ensure its security, saw the division of Germany as a strategic advantage. The tension further escalated with the establishment of two separate German states – the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany).

While West Germany thrived under a free-market economy and an alliance with the Western countries, East Germany faced economic challenges and political repression under Soviet control. The disparity between the two German states intensified the desire of East Germans to flee to West Germany, leading to a significant brain drain and economic loss for East Germany. To prevent this, East German authorities decided to build a physical barrier – the Berlin Wall – to quell the mass exodus.

The Construction of the Berlin Wall

The construction of the Berlin Wall began on August 13, 1961, catching the world by surprise. Overnight, barbed wire and barricades divided streets, families, and even buildings. The wall was eventually reinforced with concrete, guard towers, and a wide “death strip” equipped with tripwires and other deterrents. This formidable barrier was intended to halt the flow of East Germans to the West, in a desperate attempt to maintain control over the population.

The division of Berlin had profound consequences for its residents. Families were separated, and individuals were stranded on the other side with no chance of return. The division of the city had a significant psychological impact, reinforcing the idea that Berlin was the frontline of a global struggle between communism and capitalism.

The International Response

Internationally, the division of Berlin drew widespread condemnation. Western countries saw the construction of the Berlin Wall as a blatant violation of human rights and a physical manifestation of the Iron Curtain. It served as a stark reminder of the repression faced by those living in the communist Eastern Bloc.

The United States and its allies responded with various measures to demonstrate their support for West Berlin and their opposition to Soviet expansion. One such response was the Berlin Airlift in 1948-1949 when the Western Allies flew in supplies, such as food and fuel, to sustain the citizens of West Berlin during a Soviet blockade. This dramatic effort highlighted Western determination and solidarity.

The Fall of the Wall

The division of Berlin endured for almost three decades, until November 9, 1989, when the Berlin Wall unexpectedly fell. The catalyst for this momentous event was a combination of internal and external pressures. Internally, the citizens of East Germany had grown increasingly dissatisfied with the political and economic situation, leading to protests and demands for change. Externally, the political landscape had shifted, with the Soviet Union under Mikhail Gorbachev embracing reform and adopting a more permissive stance towards Eastern Europe.

On that fateful day, thousands of East Berliners flocked to the checkpoints, demanding passage into West Berlin. The overwhelmed border guards, faced with a surge of people and lacking clear instructions from the government, opened the gates. The fall of the Berlin Wall marked a symbolic end to the division of East and West Berlin and signified the beginning of the end of the Cold War.

Conclusion

The division of Berlin into East and West was a direct result of the ideological differences between the Soviet Union and the Western Allies. The construction of the Berlin Wall served as a physical and psychological symbol of this division. It acted as a barrier to prevent the mass exodus of East Germans to the more prosperous West and reinforced the hostilities between the two blocs. However, the fall of the Berlin Wall demonstrated the power of the people and the desire for freedom. It was a pivotal moment that left an indelible mark on history, bringing hope and uniting a divided city once again.

Thank you for reading. If you're inspired by the stories of Berlin and want to delve deeper, why not join us on our Free Berlin Walking Tour? It's a wonderful way to immerse yourself in the city's rich history and vibrant culture. We look forward to welcoming you soon.

WHAT TO EXPECT

  • 3.5 hours walking tour
  • Berlin’s major highlights
  • Brandenburg Gate
  • Reichstag and Berlin Wall
  • Historical sites

Free Walking Tour Berlin

When: Every day 10am & 12pm every day
Where: The meeting point is in front of the ehemaliges Kaiserliches Postfuhramt Berlin, Oranienburger Straße, 10117 Berlin, Germany, next to the entrance.
Price: Free